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Quick Tips: Buying Used Equipment Online

The internet has helped facilitate many transactions between buyers and sellers of used screen printing equipment and supplies. Unfortunately for some buyers, the package received doesn’t always match up with the description provided by the seller.  Here’s a few basic guidelines to follow when buying any used (or new) equipment and supplies from other individuals on classified forums or other websites.

Pictures – Be sure that the seller can provide pictures of the product. In this day and age, everybody has a camera phone, digital camera, or camera on their computer. If the seller can’t provide a picture of the product, stay away.

Get it in writing – Ask for an invoice or receipt. Ensure that every item is listed and priced as agreed by the two parties. Be sure that any tax or shipping costs are also mentioned.

Check local listings – See if you can find any of the products that you want in your area first. Customize your search options and see if you can pick-up locally or cut down the shipping time.

Payment options – Pay in a form such as credit card or check. Wiring money can become a problem if you have to get a refund due to a dispute or incorrect product. Have record of the transaction in form of a receipt and invoice if at all possible.

Be sure to cover all your bases before purchasing anything from an individual over a classifieds forum or other website. Have record of every transaction. You don’t want to get burned and have no way of getting a refund!

– Tance Hughes is President of Tesep Supply Company. The company sells textile screen printing supplies and offers training to new and existing screen printers.

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Quick Tips: Which Adhesive Do I Use?

There are two types of adhesives that are used in the screen printing industry, aerosol and water based. We will outline the pros and cons of each and tell you which one we recommend that you use.

Aerosol

PROS:

  • Doesn’t require a halt in production.
  • Quicker to use.

CONS:

  • Overspray gets on everything.
  • End users tend to breathe in overspray.
  • Must be used more often due to less tack.

Water Based

PROS:

  • Doesn’t make a mess.
  • Lasts longer between applications.
  • Much healthier for end users.

CONS:

  • Takes a little bit longer to apply.

After reading the pros and cons, I am sure you know which one we will recommend.

Aerosol adhesive is not only bad for your health, it’s bad for the overall cleanliness of your shop. Take the little bit of extra time required and use water based adhesive if you truly care about these things.

– Tance Hughes is President of Tesep Supply Company. The company sells textile screen printing supplies and offers training to new and existing screen printers.

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Quick Tips: Ghost Images

Ever wondered why your screens keep a faint “ghost” image in your screen? I’m going to quickly share with you why this happens and how to eliminate it.

Ink passes in and out of mesh openings during the printing process. After printing, most printers put the dirty screen in the rack and move on to the next job. The dirty screen has leftover ink particles sitting in the mesh openings and “staining” the mesh. Once the screen is reclaimed a ghost image remains in the mesh and the printer then has to either go back and use a dehazing product to get the stain out or emulsifies the hazed screen and leaves the screen with the image embedded into the mesh. By taking a few seconds after the finish of a print run to clean out the mesh openings, a printer can save time, money, and effort in their cleaning process.

Once you are finished with a print run, immediately take ink remover and wipe out the exposed mesh in your stencil on your screen. This removes the ink and doesn’t allow it to sit and stain the mesh. Even if you plan to use the screen the next day, it is wise to go ahead and clean out the stencil to protect again the staining.

When your screen is taken to be reclaimed, the mesh will have little or no haze. By taking the simple step of immediately removing ink from your stencil after a print run, you will encounter much less need to use a dehazing product, much less time and effort spent dehazing your screens, and you will be able to print more ink in one stroke due to clean mesh!

– Tance Hughes is President of Tesep Supply Company. The company sells textile screen printing supplies and offers training to new and existing screen printers.

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